Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Indian Mosque in Hyderabad Use English Language Sermons to Attract Jama'at




A mosque in the Indian city of Hyderabad switched to using English for sermons in an effort to increase citizen participation and spread Islamic da'wah.
"I am more conditioned to listen and understand English better than I understand Urdu," Abdul Rahim Insiya, a 23-year-old psychology graduate, told the Times of India on Tuesday (12/6).


"And because I am thirsty for understanding religion, it makes perfect sense that I came to this mosque."
The mosque in Banjara Hills, Hyderabad, began offering English services to its worshipers.
The result is that more pilgrims regularly visit the mosque that has the air-conditioned room.
Preachers ensure the comfortable atmosphere in the mosque they say is very conducive to studying religion.

Unlike traditional scholars, the mosque offers lectures and sermons on topical subjects delivered by professionals working in various companies who have a practical approach to learning religion.

A large number of foreign students also came to this mosque when lectures were given in English, in contrast to other mosques which offered Friday sermons in Urdu.
"All ordinary young Muslims speak in English," said Syed Zaheeruddin, an assistant manager at an MNC company in Hi-Tec City.
"We are educated in schools with English as an introduction. We carry out our professional assignments in English.
"And even though Urdu is our mother tongue, we also speak to our children in English at home. So, everything taught here is easily understood."

Mosque officials say English-language sermons are the first step in religious studies, giving priority to attracting pilgrims back to the mosque.

"The principle of communication is the transmission of ideas and knowledge," said Mirza Baig Yawar, a management engineer and consultant who also works as a imam and mosque preacher.
"English has become the world language and the language of education for young people.


Eramuslim / The Truth Seeker Media


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