Fuel treatments for small engines

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Dead Man Walking
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Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by Dead Man Walking » Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:10 pm

I've used Sta-Bil fuel stabilizer in the ethanol blended gasoline that is sold at gas stations for years. I have never encountered any problems until recently. I bought a 2017 John Deere lawn tractor with a 724cc (M44) Briggs and Stratton V twin engine. The owner's manual suggests using a fuel stabilizer; consequently, I continued to use Sta-Bil fuel stabilizer. After 20 hours of operation, the engine began surging and sputtering. My John Deere dealership replaced the carburetor under warranty.

Since the repair, several knowledgeable people have told me that I should use a fuel treatment designed to counteract the problems caused by the ethanol in gasoline and stabilize the fuel. Sta-Bil 360° Performance, Star Tron Enzyme Fuel Treatment, and Sea Foam Motor Treatment are three additives that have been suggested. Anyone have experience with any of these or have other suggestions?

DMW

greenfire
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by greenfire » Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:27 pm

My husband has been using the startron product and loves the way it works.

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Sandtrap
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by Sandtrap » Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:32 pm

Dead Man Walking wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:10 pm
I've used Sta-Bil fuel stabilizer in the ethanol blended gasoline that is sold at gas stations for years. I have never encountered any problems until recently. I bought a 2017 John Deere lawn tractor with a 724cc (M44) Briggs and Stratton V twin engine. The owner's manual suggests using a fuel stabilizer; consequently, I continued to use Sta-Bil fuel stabilizer. After 20 hours of operation, the engine began surging and sputtering. My John Deere dealership replaced the carburetor under warranty.

Since the repair, several knowledgeable people have told me that I should use a fuel treatment designed to counteract the problems caused by the ethanol in gasoline and stabilize the fuel. Sta-Bil 360° Performance, Star Tron Enzyme Fuel Treatment, and Sea Foam Motor Treatment are three additives that have been suggested. Anyone have experience with any of these or have other suggestions?

DMW
Did you try just running it without the fuel stabilizer. And, try using Stabil if it's going to sit for a long time. Or stored gas cans are going to sit long.
Modern engines can handle modern gasoline. Older engines have the rubber and plastic gaskets dissolved by the ethanol, also gunk and water settles to the bottom of the float bowls and tanks. 20 hours of use is not much at all.
I have a large Husqvarna with a similar engine and the only time I put additives is for winter non use. Otherwise, as long as it's being used occasionally it's fine. When you said John Deere I thought of my tractor but that's diesel so not the same thing.
IMHO for a new 2017 engine with only 20 hours on it, there should never have been a problem. Suggest draining out everything you've got in there, clean or replace the fuel filter if it's gunky, and start all over again with just plain gas with no additives. If it still has problems, that's a problem. I have several riding and zero turn mowers and those engines are fairly hardy no matter what goes into the tank. It's strange that a brand new engine should be so sensitive to what's put in it.
Hope this helps.
Old Gearhead.
Last edited by Sandtrap on Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

fsrph
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by fsrph » Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:41 pm

Dead Man Walking wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:10 pm
I've used Sta-Bil fuel stabilizer in the ethanol blended gasoline that is sold at gas stations for years. I have never encountered any problems until recently. I bought a 2017 John Deere lawn tractor with a 724cc (M44) Briggs and Stratton V twin engine. The owner's manual suggests using a fuel stabilizer; consequently, I continued to use Sta-Bil fuel stabilizer. After 20 hours of operation, the engine began surging and sputtering. My John Deere dealership replaced the carburetor under warranty.

Since the repair, several knowledgeable people have told me that I should use a fuel treatment designed to counteract the problems caused by the ethanol in gasoline and stabilize the fuel. Sta-Bil 360° Performance, Star Tron Enzyme Fuel Treatment, and Sea Foam Motor Treatment are three additives that have been suggested. Anyone have experience with any of these or have other suggestions?

DMW
I've used the red Stabil with mixed results in my lawnmower. I received a tip to use Stabil Marine instead and it has worked flawlessly. The Marine is more expensive but you use less per gallon of gas.

https://goldeagle.com/sta-bil-marine

Francis
"Success is getting what you want. Happiness is wanting what you get." | Dale Carnegie

Wakefield1
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by Wakefield1 » Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:30 pm

The Marine Stabil has been claimed as better than the other kind.

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jabberwockOG
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by jabberwockOG » Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:40 pm

I always use non ethanol fuel in my yard equipment and also use fuel stabilizer in the gas can. My 2.5 gallon can lasts about 3 months which is about the limit for a fuel stabilizer. There are sites on the web that list gas stations selling non ethanol fuel in your area.

Wallyt4r
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by Wallyt4r » Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:17 pm

I have found a gas station that sells 93 octane no ethanol gas. It's slightly more expensive but I use it in a motorcycle and all small engines. They run so much better with no ethanol gas. Before I found this station I used (still do) Amsoil P.I. occasionally along with Stabil. The Amsoil P.I. flat works and I put it in my car every oil change for a tank. Cleans everything in the fuel system.

gd
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by gd » Mon Oct 30, 2017 5:06 am

Find a hobbyist pilot who can get 100LL (100 octane low lead) aviation gas. I don't think vendors are allowed to sell it to the public for non-aviation use.

pangea33
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by pangea33 » Mon Oct 30, 2017 7:37 am

I ride and maintain a motorcycle as a hobby. It's an older carbureted v-twin and ethanol can really do a number on the jets and leave gum in the float bowl. One of the very best additive in my opinion is Sea Foam. It can be used to stabilize the fuel for storage, but it also can be run periodically to keep everything in very clean working order.

I occasionally pull my carburetor apart as part of routine maintenance, and also because I enjoy tinkering. It basically hasn't required any sort of cleaning since I started running this additive 4 years ago. I run it in my push mower too. 5 years old and still starts by the second pull every spring.

I usually run about an oz per gallon of fuel, every three or four tanks. I also put about a couple ounces in my mower when I put it up for the winter.

https://seafoamsales.com/how-to-add-sea ... sel-fuels/

https://walmart.com/ip/Sea-Foam-SF- ... z/16664932

jebmke
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by jebmke » Mon Oct 30, 2017 7:57 am

jabberwockOG wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:40 pm
I always use non ethanol fuel in my yard equipment and also use fuel stabilizer in the gas can. My 2.5 gallon can lasts about 3 months which is about the limit for a fuel stabilizer. There are sites on the web that list gas stations selling non ethanol fuel in your area.
this is what I do. Mine are small items like a brush cutter. I just run the gas out at the end of the season, change the oil and I never have any trouble starting up in the spring.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

neilpilot
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by neilpilot » Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:20 am

gd wrote:
Mon Oct 30, 2017 5:06 am
Find a hobbyist pilot who can get 100LL (100 octane low lead) aviation gas. I don't think vendors are allowed to sell it to the public for non-aviation use.
Many (most) small airports have self-serve pumps. In theory, they're only to refuel aircraft, but you don't need to be a pilot to buy a few gallons.

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jharkin
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by jharkin » Mon Oct 30, 2017 1:40 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:32 pm
Modern engines can handle modern gasoline. Older engines have the rubber and plastic gaskets dissolved by the ethanol, also gunk and water settles to the bottom of the float bowls and tanks. 20 hours of use is not much at all.
I have a large Husqvarna with a similar engine and the only time I put additives is for winter non use. Otherwise, as long as it's being used occasionally it's fine. When you said John Deere I thought of my tractor but that's diesel so not the same thing.
IMHO for a new 2017 engine with only 20 hours on it, there should never have been a problem. Suggest draining out everything you've got in there, clean or replace the fuel filter if it's gunky, and start all over again with just plain gas with no additives. If it still has problems, that's a problem. I have several riding and zero turn mowers and those engines are fairly hardy no matter what goes into the tank. It's strange that a brand new engine should be so sensitive to what's put in it.
Hope this helps.
Old Gearhead.
+1000

There is a lot of urban legends, myths and just plain FUD that floats around the internet about ethanol blended gas. When it was first introduced there was a rash of old small engines having problem but that was primarily for two reasons:

#1 - As mentioned ethanol degrades natural rubber. Older carbs and fuel systems used natural rubber fuel lines and carb parts (like the pump diaphragms in walbro 2 stroke carbs) which would disintegrate.
#2 Ethanol is a very strong solvent. It will actually clean up old varnish deposits left from years of non detergent gasoline which would then clog up the jets.

So you have a rash of engine failures, mechanics look at them and the only thing that changed was the ethanol so it gets blamed and bingo urban legends start claiming that ethanol causes gum deposits and corrosion.

Any small engine build in the last 10 years or so should be completely safe on ethanol blended fuels since all the lines and rubber diaphragms are made from ethanol safe materials like Tygon (the clear yellow fuel tubing common on chainsaws), viton (black synthetic rubber also used in fuel tubing, seals, and carb diaphragms) and Teflon (used in carb diaphragms).

The one remaining issue is the water buildup. Its true that ethanol attracts water, but it also acts to help keep the water suspended in the fuel so it goes through the engine and burns off, rather than separating and sinking to the bottom of hte gas tank. Water is a big problem for boats where the really humid environment can attract so much water that it reaches the phase separation point and the alcohol water mix seperates and sinks to the bottom rusting the mteal gas tank (and reducing the octane rating of hte seperated gas).

To illustrate this point - what was the traditional treatment for water issues in small engines? Adding IsoHEET or Drygas. Go lookup the MSDS for Drygas and see what the primary ingredient is :)

jabberwockOG wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:40 pm
I always use non ethanol fuel in my yard equipment and also use fuel stabilizer in the gas can. My 2.5 gallon can lasts about 3 months which is about the limit for a fuel stabilizer. There are sites on the web that list gas stations selling non ethanol fuel in your area.

Nope... Regular pump gas last at least 6 months so long as its sealed air tight in a dark container. Ive burned fuel older than that without a problem. And this is all E10. Stabilizer manufactures like Stabil and SeaFoam claim they can make treated fuel viable for 1-2 years.

Doing some googling I found one reference claiming your quoted 3 month shelf life for gas, but big surprise that was on a website selling "alcohol test kits" I would give a lot more credence to information from the oil majors, like this datasheet from BP that specs 6-12 months for untreated fuel:
https://bp.com/content/dam/bp-count ... ndling.pdf

Wallyt4r wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:17 pm
I have found a gas station that sells 93 octane no ethanol gas. It's slightly more expensive but I use it in a motorcycle and all small engines. They run so much better with no ethanol gas. Before I found this station I used (still do) Amsoil P.I. occasionally along with Stabil. The Amsoil P.I. flat works and I put it in my car every oil change for a tank. Cleans everything in the fuel system.
Are you sure it runs better and its not just psychology? Small engines are not very picky at all about fuel. I'm an RC hobbyist and we use engines that are basically highly tuned two stroke chainsaw engines. Guys run them on everything from 87 octane pump gas, to race gas (becuase they want to burn money I guess?...) to Coleman camp stove fuel.

Yes you read that right... Coleman camp stove fuel. Its actually blended from Naptha and about 55 octane. Hobbyists use it in small engines because it has no gas odor and you can store engines inside. Expensive but the interesting part is it works, and dyno tests showed that the small 2 stroke engines actually made slightly MORE horsepower on that than on 87. And in turn made more HP on 87 than on 93.

So just like a car, using any more octane than the engine was designed for is just a waste of money.....
gd wrote:
Mon Oct 30, 2017 5:06 am
Find a hobbyist pilot who can get 100LL (100 octane low lead) aviation gas. I don't think vendors are allowed to sell it to the public for non-aviation use.

And now you will introduce two new problems:

#1 - You will start to lead foul your spark plugs.

#2 - You will be breathing all that lovely leaded exhuast, with all the adverse health effects.

And if you think the neurotoxic effects of lead are no big deal, you might want to do some research
https://forbes.com/sites/alexknapp/ ... 961c0612c4



So the bottom line... should you use a stabilizer like Stabil or SeaFoam?

Yea, probably... I haven't seen anything that shows stabilizers cause harm and in full disclosure I do treat all my small engine fuel with it. However it should also be noted that there is very little in the way of independent data showing that stabilizers actually do much good either.

i.e.
https://practical-sailor.com/issues ... 692-1.html



More reading on ethanol:
https://westmarine.com/WestAdvisor/ ... Fuel-Myths

wrongfunds
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by wrongfunds » Mon Oct 30, 2017 4:32 pm

+1

Yours was the best write up about the fuel treatments! I still use the Stabil Marine but I suspect all it is doing is providing some placebo effect for me!

Dead Man Walking
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by Dead Man Walking » Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:25 pm

jharkin wrote:
Mon Oct 30, 2017 1:40 pm

So the bottom line... should you use a stabilizer like Stabil or SeaFoam?

Yea, probably... I haven't seen anything that shows stabilizers cause harm and in full disclosure I do treat all my small engine fuel with it. However it should also be noted that there is very little in the way of independent data showing that stabilizers actually do much good either.

i.e.
https://practical-sailor.com/issues ... 692-1.html

More reading on ethanol:
https://westmarine.com/WestAdvisor/ ... Fuel-Myths
Thanks for the excellent links. Sta-Bil Marine and Star Tron receive the highest rating in the tests that I found using Google. There are a multitude of fuel treatments on the market. Briggs and Stratton is marketing their own 5 in 1 Advanced Fuel Treatment and Stabilizer at Home Depot.

One review stated that blue Sta-Bil Marine contained twice the additives of regular red Sta-Bil. I'm going to double the amount of red until I use up what I have. Sta-Bil has a superior container since the bottle has a measuring spout. Most others require the use of a measuring device such as a shot glass.

I'm sure that my problem was a defective carburetor; however, I'm going to use a fuel treatment and stabilizer to maintain the warranty. Briggs and Stratton should manufacture engines that can use the gasoline available to 90% of Americans. I can understand using a stabilizer for winter storage, but weekly use is another story.

DMW

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tcassette
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by tcassette » Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:34 pm

jabberwockOG wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:40 pm
I always use non ethanol fuel in my yard equipment and also use fuel stabilizer in the gas can. My 2.5 gallon can lasts about 3 months which is about the limit for a fuel stabilizer. There are sites on the web that list gas stations selling non ethanol fuel in your area.
+1

whomever
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by whomever » Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:45 pm

Adding IsoHEET or Drygas. Go lookup the MSDS for Drygas and see what the primary ingredient is
I'm guessing 'Not Ethanol' :-).

Those are usually mostly isopropyl alcohol (IsoHeet) or methanol (Drygas, if I found the right MSDS). Most of the ones I've read the labels on over the years were methanol based.

(not disagreeing that modern engines tolerate ethanol, just pointing out that tolerating isopropyl or methanol isn't exactly the same as tolerating ethanol).

CJC000
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by CJC000 » Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:52 pm

Never let small engines with fuel containing ethanol sit for any length of time. They will run fine at first, but the fuel will not keep, corrodes the fuel bowl and other small components of the carburetor. My local Stihl dealer won't let a power tool leave his store unless you promise to use ethanol free premium fuel. Stihl and others even sell ethanol free premium fuel in metal cans for use if you can't find the proper fuel. SIL has worked for years with the US Forest Service and they NEVER use ethanol fuels, always drain and run till empty at the end of the season. After several > $100 carb repairs, I learned my lesson...

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Ged
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by Ged » Mon Oct 30, 2017 10:10 pm

One thing aware of is that Sta-Bil itself has a claimed shelf life of 2 years after opening. I expect it, much like modern gasoline itself is hydroscopic.

JBTX
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by JBTX » Mon Oct 30, 2017 10:21 pm

For the past year or two I have been using whatever the fuel stablizer additive is you buy at Home Depot, and have generally had no issues in my 2 cycle engines since doing so. Prior to that it seemed like I had more issues.

As to those finding no ethanol gas, it must vary by area. I've looked online and and can't find anywhere near me that does, other than at home depot where you can buy a small can of ethanol free gas, maybe a quart, for a couple of/several bucks.

edit:

About a gallon and a half costs $35.

https://homedepot.com/p/TruFuel-4-C ... /203572162

Listing of ethanol free gas stations. Unfortunately nearest to me is about 45 minutes away, in a place that I never go by.

https://pure-gas.org/

Wallyt4r
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by Wallyt4r » Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:15 am

Yes I'm sure it runs better with the Amsoil P.I. I use Sta=bil in between and usually only run the P.I. once a season in my yard and small engines. It keeps the fuel systems on the motors in shape. As mentioned I also put it in my car and motorcycle after every oil change. The stuff works.

https://amsoil.com/shop/by-product/ ... -additive/

Wallyt4r
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by Wallyt4r » Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:19 am

JBTX wrote:
Mon Oct 30, 2017 10:21 pm
For the past year or two I have been using whatever the fuel stablizer additive is you buy at Home Depot, and have generally had no issues in my 2 cycle engines since doing so. Prior to that it seemed like I had more issues.

As to those finding no ethanol gas, it must vary by area. I've looked online and and can't find anywhere near me that does, other than at home depot where you can buy a small can of ethanol free gas, maybe a quart, for a couple of/several bucks.

edit:

About a gallon and a half costs $35.

https://homedepot.com/p/TruFuel-4-C ... /203572162

Listing of ethanol free gas stations. Unfortunately nearest to me is about 45 minutes away, in a place that I never go by.

https://pure-gas.org/
Thats a bummer you don't have one closer. When I switched to ethanol free in my motorcycle it ran so much better and no it was not psychological because all my friends saw the same results. Also our mileage increased.

carolinaman
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by carolinaman » Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:59 am

Just purchased an Echo blower yesterday. The guy who sold it strongly recommends using gas with no ethanol for all small engines. He claims they will run much better and be easier to start. In fact, he showed me an app called Puregas which can be used to locate stations that sell non ethanol gas. This was from a dealer who sells all kinds of small engine equipment (not a big box store) and he seemed to really know his stuff.

I know that I go through a lot of spark plugs with my small engines due to problems starting. He claims pure gas will eliminate that problem.

queso
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by queso » Tue Oct 31, 2017 7:01 am

I've always had good luck treating all my gas cans with Stabil and using that year round. Then my small engines are already ready for winterization (if you trust Stabil). Ethanol free gas would be nice, but I'd need it in large quantities (3 motorcycles, 2 mowers, probably another 7-8 small engines around the place for various stuff) and the nearest station is about an hour from me. I figure the total cost over the lifetime of all my small engines would be higher driving to get ethanol free gas than it would be to just deal with whatever problems the ethanol causes (IMO, a bit exaggerated from my experience, but what do I know).
Last edited by queso on Tue Oct 31, 2017 7:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

likegarden
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by likegarden » Tue Oct 31, 2017 7:04 am

For my snow blower and lawn mower I only use high octane fuel which has no ethanol. I thought that was common knowledge. When not in use I put stabilizer in the tanks and run the engine once.

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sunny_socal
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by sunny_socal » Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:23 am

OP I don't think your problem had anything to do with bad gas or ethanol - likely just a plugged up carb.

I follow these little rules to keep my engines running:
- Buy 91 octane gas
- Immediately mix with fuel stabilizer (I use PRI-G brand, available online and elsewhere)
- Run the engines every month or so
- After a run, allow the carb to run dry and let the engine stall
- Change the oil and clean the air filter once a year

I'd love to run aviation fuel but California is like a black hole per that 'pure gas' website!

forgeblast
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by forgeblast » Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:32 am

When storing fuel I use seafoam, that way its in the tank if the machine sits. For chainsaws and weedwackers I use 93 octane.

neilpilot
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by neilpilot » Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:35 am

likegarden wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 7:04 am
For my snow blower and lawn mower I only use high octane fuel which has no ethanol. I thought that was common knowledge. When not in use I put stabilizer in the tanks and run the engine once.
Myth buster; only MO and MT permit ethanol-free premium fuel. BTW ethanol has an octane rating of 113.

sco
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by sco » Tue Oct 31, 2017 1:34 pm

neilpilot wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:35 am
likegarden wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 7:04 am
For my snow blower and lawn mower I only use high octane fuel which has no ethanol. I thought that was common knowledge. When not in use I put stabilizer in the tanks and run the engine once.
Myth buster; only MO and MT permit ethanol-free premium fuel. BTW ethanol has an octane rating of 113.
I can't think of a small engine that has enough compression to actually need high octane. However they all do seem to run better on real gas, and it certainly stores better.

Ethanol bonds with water, which is heavier that the rest of the fuel.

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sunny_socal
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by sunny_socal » Tue Oct 31, 2017 2:13 pm

sco wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 1:34 pm
neilpilot wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:35 am
likegarden wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 7:04 am
For my snow blower and lawn mower I only use high octane fuel which has no ethanol. I thought that was common knowledge. When not in use I put stabilizer in the tanks and run the engine once.
Myth buster; only MO and MT permit ethanol-free premium fuel. BTW ethanol has an octane rating of 113.
I can't think of a small engine that has enough compression to actually need high octane. However they all do seem to run better on real gas, and it certainly stores better.

Ethanol bonds with water, which is heavier that the rest of the fuel.
My Stihl chainsaw manual specifies high octane gas. I therefore use it in all my small engines and they haven't complained! 8-)

Wallyt4r
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by Wallyt4r » Tue Oct 31, 2017 2:46 pm

neilpilot wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:35 am
likegarden wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 7:04 am
For my snow blower and lawn mower I only use high octane fuel which has no ethanol. I thought that was common knowledge. When not in use I put stabilizer in the tanks and run the engine once.
Myth buster; only MO and MT permit ethanol-free premium fuel. BTW ethanol has an octane rating of 113.
Myth buster; already mentioned I buy ethanol free premium 93 octane gas. I'm in NC.

Kuna_Papa_Wengi
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by Kuna_Papa_Wengi » Tue Oct 31, 2017 3:38 pm

I use sta-bil and I haven't had any problems. I use the gas in my push lawn mower with a briggs and straton engine, a 2 cycle weed eater, leaf blower, and stihl chain saw. If I think the gas is getting old, I'll pour the rest in my pickup.

I've heard good things about pri-g, but I haven't tried it yet.

sco
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by sco » Tue Oct 31, 2017 3:43 pm

sunny_socal wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 2:13 pm

My Stihl chainsaw manual specifies high octane gas. I therefore use it in all my small engines and they haven't complained! 8-)
I don't own a chainsaw. :)

Yeah the others won't complain, just don't need it. I'd do the same.

wish
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Re: Fuel treatments for small engines

Post by wish » Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:23 pm

In my experience in relatively warm tidewater Virginia, the stabilizers are more harmful than helpful. I had carb problems on my B&S engines on my mower and on my generator until I stopped using the stabilizer & have had none since. I do avoid the ethanol.

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